Today

It’s 5:30pm on the 24th of January. And it just hit me. Today marks 5 years since d-day–Lily’s Rett diagnosis day.

What a 5 years it’s been. What a roller-coaster. But I wouldn’t give it up for anything. I’ve got the sweetest, coolest almost 8 year old I know. She is my joy, my inspiration.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not easy. Every day I say to her when she’s having a tough moment–like trying to walk in the morning or crying uncontrollably in the middle of the night–that I can’t fix things. But that I can make them better. With love and comfort and compassion. But I can’t fix it. I can’t fix it.

That sucks. No one should ever have to see their child suffer so much. Every day. Every day. I’ll say it again: every day.

And we are so fortunate right now as Lily is going through a relatively stable period. And the ‘relatively’ is truly that. I am not trying to sugarcoat any of it: our ‘normal’ is anything but that.

So it’s been 5 years. And we’re getting closer to the ‘cure’ but it’s still not here. And every day as Lily grows and Rett continues to ravage her body, that ‘cure’ looks less and less like a cure for her. At this point I’ll take whatever it is we can get. Just to let her have the ability to breathe with ease, to wake up and not be in pain… I’ll take it.

I can’t believe she’s going to be 8 in a few weeks. I can’t believe how much she’s grown and changed. I can’t believe how much I’ve transformed because of her. And for that, I am grateful.

In so many ways, she’s such a ‘normal’ kid. She’s been putting together weekly hair menus letting me know how she wants her hair done every day. How freaking cute is that? Currently she’s all about pigtails. As you can see from the menu and hairstyle:

Her birthday is on the 8th of February. And I wish I could give you a list of things she wants as presents. But I don’t have one because she cannot tell me outright. So if you want to do something for her, consider making a donation to Rett Syndrome research. Not only will it go to her future, but the future of all her other Rett sisters and brothers.

With love,

C & L

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A visit to the ER

Rett Syndrome has robbed so much from my child already – her voice, her ability to use her hands purposefully, her ability to breathe normally, her independence. The latest: it’s been robbing her of her ability to pee.

With Rett Syndrome – everything, and I mean every function that the human body needs to thrive – has the capacity to fail.

Lily was feeling absolutely miserable last Sunday. She hadn’t peed in over 24 hours though her liquid intake was normal over this time period.  And I was hopeful that she had a UTI, as this could explain the urine retention, but alas the results came back negative.  So I guess we got one answer – it wasn’t a UTI.

So I turned to the Rett Syndrome family support group to see if they had any suggestions and one mom sent me to this article.  I remember hearing that some girls with Rett have trouble peeing from time to time, but I never knew the extent of how dangerous it could be.

Next step? Adding another specialist to the list – a pediatric urologist. And likely I will need to learn how to catheterize my sweetie. We can’t go to the ER every time she needs to pee.